Update on Confirmed Mumps Cases and Treatment

November 7, 2017

Dear Campus Community:

Student Health Services has now confirmed a diagnosis of mumps for five students.  Two additional students with suspected mumps have been treated.  The University’s Incident Management team continues to work with the D.C. Department of Health to implement practices to manage the current cases and prevent the spread of infection.   

A sub-population of students who are at an increased risk of exposure has been identified and informed of the D.C. Department of Health’s recommendations for an MMR booster.  If additional sub-populations are identified, we will communicate with them directly with recommendations about additional prevention measures.

Mumps is a viral illness whose early symptoms typically include fever, headache, and fatigue that are followed by swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears or jaw and on the cheeks.  The symptoms typically appear 2-4 weeks after exposure.  Most people with mumps make a full recovery after a few weeks.  Return to school is allowed after 5 days of isolation. 

Mumps is spread just like other common viruses — through saliva or mucous from the mouth, nose, or throat. An infected person can therefore transmit the infection by coughing, sneezing, sharing items such as cups or beverages, intimate contact, or by touching surfaces with unwashed hands.  

If you develop a fever and swelling at the cheeks, please contact your physician to make an appointment ASAP.  Students can contact Student Health Services at 202-319-5744 to make an appointment. Student Health Services is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Please ask for a mask when you arrive and indicate your concern for possible mumps. 

Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps you can take to prevent spreading illness. Tips include: Wash hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available; cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow if tissues are not available; and avoid sharing drinking and eating utensils. The University’s facilities personnel continues to implement enhanced touch point cleaning and sanitation procedures.

I would encourage you to review the attached materials from the District of Columbia Department of Health. We will keep the campus updated as new information or new recommendations become available.  Thank you for your cooperation. 

We will keep the campus updated as new information or new recommendations become available.  Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely,
Dr. Loretta Staudt, MD
Student Health Services 

Message from Campus Chaplain: Additional Mumps Prevention Measures

November 3, 2017

Dear University Community,

Yesterday the University received confirmation of at least two cases of mumps and is awaiting test results for several other members of the community. As shared in a previous communication, mumps is spread just like other common viruses — through saliva or mucous from the mouth, nose, or throat. An infected person can therefore transmit the infection by coughing, sneezing, sharing items such as cups or beverages, intimate contact, or by touching surfaces with unwashed hands.

After consulting with a physician, I am announcing that the distribution of the Precious Blood during University Masses will be suspended until at least Thanksgiving due to the presence of mumps. Those community members who have a gluten intolerance should come to the sacristy 10 minutes before Mass to request a low gluten host for consecration since the Precious Blood will not be offered to the faithful. As a reminder: One receives the fullness of our Eucharistic Lord even when one receives Him under only one form of Holy Communion.

I am also requesting and encouraging students, faculty and staff to receive the Body of Christ in the hand until further notified. Since symptoms do not make an appearance until 2 to 4 weeks after exposure, an infected communicant's saliva can accidentally be passed to the fingers of the priest or Extraordinary Minister, and then be transmitted to other communicants. To place aside one's preference for receiving Holy Communion on the tongue as a precaution to prevent the spread of the virus will be a great act of charity and truly appreciated by those charged with distribution of Holy Communion to the faithful. Again, this is only a request.

Thank you for your cooperation and your prayers for all who have been affected.

Peace,
Father Jude DeAngelo, O.F.M. Conv.

Confirmed Diagnoses of Mumps

November 2, 2017

Dear Campus Community:

Earlier today, Student Health Services received test results for two students that confirm a diagnosis of the mumps. Including the two confirmed cases, Students Health Services has treated a total of six students with suspected mumps. Any residential student who has reported symptoms has been relocated to an unoccupied space with private bathrooms on campus to limit their exposure. Students are able to return to rooms and classes after a five-day period.

The University’s Incident Management team continues to work with the D.C. Department of Health to implement practices to manage the current cases and prevent the spread of infection. If there are populations identified who have been at an increased risk for exposure, we will communicate with them directly with recommendations about additional prevention measures. The University’s facilities personnel continues to implement enhanced touch point cleaning and sanitation procedures.

Mumps is a viral illness whose early symptoms typically include fever, headache, and fatigue that are followed by swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears or jaw and on the cheeks. The symptoms typically appear 2-4 weeks after exposure. Most people with mumps make a full recovery after a few weeks. Return to school is allowed after 5 days of isolation.

Mumps is spread just like other common viruses — through saliva or mucous from the mouth, nose, or throat. An infected person can therefore transmit the infection by coughing, sneezing, sharing items such as cups or beverages, intimate contact, or by touching surfaces with unwashed hands.

If you develop a fever and swelling at the cheeks, please contact your physician to make an appointment ASAP. Students can contact Student Health Services at 202-319-5744 to make an appointment. Student Health Services is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Please ask for a mask when you arrive and indicate your concern for possible mumps.

Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps you can take to prevent spreading illness. Tips include: Wash hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available; cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow if tissues are not available; and avoid sharing drinking and eating utensils. The University’s facilities staff has implemented enhanced touch point cleaning and sanitation procedures at this time.

I would encourage you to review the attached materials from the District of Columbia Department of Health. We will keep the campus updated as new information or new recommendations become available. Thank you for your cooperation.

Sincerely,
Dr. Loretta Staudt, MD
Student Health Services

 

Information on Suspected Mumps Cases

October 27, 2017

Dear Campus Community:

Within the past 48 hours, Student Health Services has treated three students who are experiencing swelling of the parotid glands and flu-like symptoms. While a diagnosis has not yet been confirmed, the symptoms are consistent with mumps. Student Health Services is awaiting laboratory testing to determine the official diagnosis. Out of an abundance of caution, and pursuant to University protocol, the University’s Incident Management team is working with the D.C. Department of Health to implement practices to manage the current cases and prevent the spread of infection. The three students have been relocated to unoccupied spaces with private bathrooms on campus to limit their exposure for the next 5 days.  

Mumps is a viral illness whose early symptoms typically include fever, headache, and fatigue that are followed by swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears or jaw and on the cheeks.  The symptoms typically appear 2-4 weeks after exposure.  Most people with mumps make a full recovery after a few weeks.  Return to school is allowed after 5 days of isolation.

Mumps is spread just like other common viruses—through saliva or mucous from the mouth, nose, or throat.  An infected person can therefore transmit the infection by coughing, sneezing, sharing items such as cups or beverages, intimate contact, or by touching surfaces with unwashed hands. 

If you develop a fever and swelling at the cheeks, please contact your physician to make an appointment ASAP.  Students can contact Student Health Services at 202-319-5744 to make an appointment. Student Health Services is open Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Please ask for a mask when you arrive and indicate your concern for possible mumps.

Keeping hands clean is one of the most important steps you can take to prevent spreading illness. Tips include: Wash hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available; cough or sneeze into a tissue or your elbow if tissues are not available; and avoid sharing drinking and eating utensils. The University’s facilities staff has implemented enhanced touch point cleaning and sanitation procedures at this time.

I would encourage you to review the attached materials from the District of Columbia Department of Health. We will keep the campus updated as new information or new recommendations become available.  Thank you for your cooperation. 

Sincerely,
Dr. Loretta Staudt, MD
Student Health Services

Information provided by the District of Columbia Department of Health

 

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